Research Request: Best Practices for Reopening Plans and Covid-19

Are there member communities who have established best practices for re-opening businesses, city hall, etc., after COVID-19? Working collaboratively with other municipalities on creating uniform re-opening plans. Cities may be a little unique if they did not have a statewide Stay-at-Home Order and had to take on restrictions individually.

PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS | May 12, 2020

Summary of Findings:

An analysis of the different reopening plans in communities reveals some common practices and considerations when communities form their own reopening plans.

  1. Before introducing reopening plans, ensure your community is prepared:
    • Ensure data collection is accurate and informative, and can be collected to provide early warning if new measures need to be reinstated
      • Set benchmarks to be achieved as part of reopening plans
    • Does your community have the ability to monitor and protect communities through testing, contact tracing, isolating, and supporting those who are positive or exposed (testing capacity and contact tracing capacity)?
    • Will your community and healthcare system be able to handle surges in cases of Covid-19 (surge capacity)?
    • Do businesses have the resources they need to keep workers and the public safe before reopening (i.e. PPE, cleaning supplies, plexyglass)?

 

  1. Utilize incremental phases over time that are data driven and flexible enough to alter in a changing environment
    • Open facilities up slowly to avoid increasing the risk of COVID-19
    • Utilize partial reopening, capacity limits, and more essential services open before opening of less essential services, i.e. childcare and daycare centers before gyms, and gyms and hair salons before bars, nightclubs, and entertainment venues
    • Encourage telework in early stages and minimize non-essential travel
    • Meet benchmarks before moving to the next phase
    • Expect information to change, and be prepared to reinstate safety measures

 

  1. Continue to recommend social distancing, temporary signage about the virus, and address misinformation for all businesses, workplaces, facilities, etc throughout each phase.
    • Ensure measures in place promote the safety of at-risk populations
    • All persons should continue social distancing actively despite reopening
    • At risk and vulnerable persons should continue self-quarantine in later stages of reopening, with workplace accommodations for at risk persons

 

  1. Most local authorities are able to and should make changes based on improving guidelines and info
    • Most state plans provide flexibility to their localities to implement any ordinances or orders, extensions, as needed
    • Rely on health departments, CDC, OSHA, and White House guidelines, as many communities have, to base their approach off of, and improve their approach over time as new information becomes available.

 

Introduction:

Many localities and states have been under strict shelter at home orders since March of 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The virus has affected all states, with urban communities hit hardest, and minorities, tribal communities, incarcerated persons, elderly, and medically disabled persons most at risk. States and localities have begun to release their reopening plans for services and businesses. The goal of these plans is to safely allow people to return to work while controlling the spread of the disease. Some communities have released their entire plans, while others will be releasing their plan over time as they continue to collect information, assemble their approaches, and address the nuances of tomorrow’s society.

 

Before introducing reopening plans, ensure your community is prepared.

With a great deal of variation of caseload intensity among different regions, some states and cities have begun to explore options to reopen their communities after the initial “flattening of the curve” prevented overwhelming healthcare systems.

Reopening plans may be introduced into communities even if caseloads have been low; some cities have experienced low case counts due to flattening of the curve, which means they may experience increases in active caseloads as they reopen. This alone does not mean that communities should revert to a previous phase or not advance to a new phase (Knoxville, Tennessee). However, communities should have expansive testing capacity and tracking capacity to help track number of cases at a point in time accurately. Communities should also ensure their healthcare systems are equipped to handle “surges” in cases  Many communities are waiting for “surge capacity” before relaxing stay at home orders, meaning the ability for hospitals to handle surges in cases (California, Idaho, Nevada, Tennessee, Washington).

 

Utilize incremental phases over time that promote safety and are flexible enough to alter in a changing environment.

An analysis of different communities looking to re-open, or currently reopening city services and businesses, find that most communities use incrementally structured plans laid out in phases to mitigate against increasing cases.

The majority of reopening plans use from 2 to 5 “phases” or “stages”. Some reopening plans are laid out as executive orders instead of plans. Many plans highlight that they will not shift to the next phase of the plan unless there are 14 days with no increase in cases in the community, as recommended by CDC. Other plans suggest that before moving to the next phase, certain benchmarks are criteria need to be met, as well as the ability to collect accurate data on those benchmarks (Idaho, California, Tennessee, Kansas, Nevada, Washington).

Additionally, guidelines and practices for reopening up communities’ services and businesses are evolving, and so each reopening plan should also be flexible enough to adjust to new data and recommendations from health departments and organizations, i.e. CDC, WHO.

Communication and data collection is critical at this time to inform the effects of reopening and transition between phases smoothly. Appropriate decisions and policies should be established before moving to the next phase i.e. considerations to wages of employees who do not feel secure returning to work, wage replacement and policies that allow workers to stay home if they are sick.

Most plans utilize measures such as partial reopening, capacity limits, and the reopening of businesses that are a) essential or b) minimize group amounts, i.e. childcare centers and hair salons before gyms, and gyms and restaurants before theaters and entertainment venues (Kansas, Nevada, Tennessee, Washington). Some localities require business plans to be submitted for approval by a public health entity before reopening (Idaho). Encourage telework in early stages and minimize non-essential travel.

Lastly, plans are comprehensive in addressing employees, individuals, businesses, educational facilities, and activity venues, retailers, in each phase, to ensure clarity.

 

Continue to recommend social distancing, temporary signage about the virus, and address misinformation for all businesses, workplaces, facilities, etc.

All plans mention that elderly individuals take should extra precautions, and that service options are available to avoid putting at risk individuals into harms way i.e. no visitors in senior homes, delivery services, and over the phone city services (California, Idaho, Georgia, Nevada, Missouri, Kansas, Tennessee, Washington).

Plans should promote continued social distancing and hygiene measures up until vaccines or therapeutics become available (Idaho, California, Washington,). Further, employers should provide proper personal protective equipment appropriate to the function of the job. Signage should be used to advertise and communicate continued social distancing, gathering, and hygiene measures (Tennessee, Georgia).

 

Most local authorities are able to and should make changes based on improving guidelines and info.

Given the uncertainty of reopening at this time, localities should be prepared to reinstate shelter at home orders if necessary. Some communities have greater flexibility than others in their choices to reopen/close, where some local counties and health departments have been granted the ability to make local decisions based on local case data as to whether or not to extend shelter at home orders. Most state plans provide flexibility to their localities to implement any ordinances or orders, extensions, as needed. If your state does not, ensure your locality and places of business are prepared with social distancing guidelines and practices that enable the safety of employees and customers, such as capacity limits (Missouri)

Communities have largely drawn from the CDC, OSHA, and White House guidelines to form their plans to ensure they are supporting and not harming the region’s public health. Many (but not all) communities also rely on the guidance of their state and county leadership for reopening guidelines. These guidelines may change as more information about the virus comes out, learning lessons emerge, and treatment options and vaccines become available, etc.

 

Communities’ Reopening Plans:

Members willing to discuss reopening plans 

Cedar Rapids, IA

Population - 133,000

 

Douglassville, GA 

Population - 35,000

 

Other communities that have formed reopening plans at this time include:

Boise, ID

Population - 229,000

 

Jackson, MO

Population - 15,000

 

Johnson County and Shawnee, KS

Population - 602,400 and 65,800

 

Knoxville, TN

Population - 187,500

 

Nashville, TN

Population - 692,600

 

State reopening plans:

California

Idaho

Iowa

Kansas

Missouri

Nevada

Tennessee

Washington

 

Reopening Plans for Public Sector and Business

The following reopening plans and roadmaps are organized by State:

 

California

Update on California’s Pandemic Roadmap

The State of California has entered its second phase of its plan. This plan allows for regional governments i.e. counties and localities to relax stricter orders at a faster rate. It also highlights the establishment of a Covid-19 surveillance system to better justify when it is safe to move to the next phase.

 

The phases are as follows:

  1. Safety and Preparedness
    1. Continue to build out testing, contact tracing, PPE, and hospital
    2. Surge capacity
      1. Continue to make essential workplaces as safe as possible.
      2. Physical and work flow adaption
      3. Essential workforce safety net
      4. Make PPE more widely available
      5. Individual behavior changes
      6. Prepare sector-by-sector safety guidelines for expanded workforce.
  2. Lower Risk Workplaces
    1. Gradually opening some lower risk workplaces with ADAPTATIONS:
      1. Retail (e.g. curbside pickup)
      2. Manufacturing
      3. Offices (when telework not possible)
      4. Opening more public spaces
    2. Expanded Workforce Safety Net
      1. Wage replacement so workers can stay home when sick
    3. Schools and Childcare Facilities with Adaptations:
      1. Summer programs and next school year potentially starting sooner (July/August)
      2. Childcare facilities to provide more care
      3. Address learning gaps
      4. Ensure students and staff are protected
      5. Allow broader workforce to return to work
    4. Key indicator considerations to move to Stage 2:
      1. Hospitalization and ICU trends stable.
      2. Hospital surge capacity to meet demand.
      3. Sufficient PPE supply to meet demand.
      4. Sufficient testing capacity to meet demand.
      5. Contact tracing capacity statewide.
  3. Higher Risk Workplaces
    1. Open higher risk environments with adaptations and limits on size of gatherings:
      1. Personal care (hair and nail salons, gyms)
      2. Entertainment venues (movie theaters, sports without live audiences)
      3. In-person religious services (churches, weddings)
  4. End of Stay at Home Order
    1. Re-open highest risk workplaces with all indicators satisfied once therapeutics have been developed:
      1. Concerts
      2. Convention Centers
      3. Live audience sports

 

California Guide to Reopening 

The state of California identifies the key questions and considerations that communities should be asking themselves before they move to Phase 1.

 

6 indicators for modifying stay at home order:

  1. The ability to monitor and protect our communities through testing, contact tracing, isolating, and supporting those who are positive or exposed
    1.  Key Questions
      1. How prepared is our state to test everyone who is symptomatic?
      2. Do we have the ability to identify contacts of those who are positive to reduce further transmission?
  2. The ability to prevent infection in people who are at risk for more severe COVID-19
    1. Key Questions
      1. Are older Californians and the medically vulnerable living in their own homes supported so they can continue appropriate physical distancing?
      2. Have we developed a plan to quickly identify and contain outbreaks in facilities housing older Californians, those living with disabilities, those currently incarcerated, and those with co-morbidities?
  3. The ability of the hospital and health systems to handle surges
    1. Key Questions:
      1. Do we have adequate bed capacity, staff and supplies such as ventilators and masks?
      2. Can our healthcare system adequately address COVID19 and other critical healthcare needs?
  4. The ability to develop therapeutics to meet the demand
    1. Key Questions:
      1. Have we built a coalition of private, public, and academic partners to accelerate the development of therapeutics?
      2. Have we identified potential therapeutics that have shown promise?
  5. The ability for businesses, schools, and childcare facilities to support physical distancing
    1. Key Questions
      1. Have we worked with businesses to support physical distancing practices and introduced guidelines to provide health checks when employees or the general public enter the premises?
      2. Do we have supplies and equipment to keep the workforce and customers safe?
  6. The ability to determine when to reinstitute certain measures, such as the stay-at-home orders, if necessary
    1. Key Questions
      1. Are we tracking the right data to provide us an early warning system?
      2. Do we have the ability to quickly communicate the need to reinstate these measures?

 

Georgia

State of Georgia Executive Orders

https://www.douglasvillega.gov/home/showdocument?id=824 

https://www.douglasvillega.gov/Home/Components/News/News/519/466

 

Georgia began allowing minimum basic operations of businesses on April 24th, 2020.

Minimum basic operations include the:

  1. “Minimum necessary activities to maintain the value of the business, establishment, corporation, non profit corporation/organization, provide services, manage inventory, ensure security, process payroll and employee benefits, or for related functions”.
  2. “Minimum necessary activities to facilitate employees or volunteers being able to work remotely from their residents or members or patrons being able to participate remotely from residences
  3. Instances where employees are working outdoors without regular contact with other persons such as delivery services, contractors, landscape businesses, and agricultural industry.

 

These minimum basic operations were expanded to gyms, fitness centers, bowling alleys, body art studios, estheticians, hair designers, and massage therapists as long as they implement the following measures:

  • Screening evaluating workers who show signs of illness or fever
  • Requiring workers who report as ill to not report for work and seek medical attention
  • Enhancing sanitation in the workplace as appropriate
  • Requiring handwashing of appropriate workers at appropriate stations
  • Providing personal protective equipment to workers appropriate to the function of the worker
  • Prohibiting gathering of workers during working hours, but allowing breaks
  • Implementing teleworking for all workers possible, and staggered shifts if its not possible
  • Alternative points of sale outside the workspace, like curbside pickup
  • Maintaining 6 feet of space between workers, and promoting social distancing of customers
  • And more…

They extended their state of emergency through June 12th to maintain effective emergency response operations to all regions, and signed an order requiring medical fragile and elderly Georgians to continue to shelter in place through June 12th, 2020.  Court hearings will reopen on May 13th

Long-term care facilities – including nursing homes, personal care homes, assisted living facilities, and similar community living homes – will utilize enhanced infection control protocols, ensure safer living conditions, and protect residents and staff from coronavirus exposure.

 

Douglassville, GA 

Reopening Internal Operations:

Response from Douglassville’s Community Outreach Coordinator, Aaron Szarowicz: 

The City of Douglasville is taking a very conservative approach when it comes to reopening. As you may or may not know, we closed all city facilities to the public back in mid-March, but employees have still been working both on site and remotely. Last week, Governor Kemp issued his executive order allowing certain businesses to reopen. The City of Douglasville did immediately respond by reopening right away.

Our plan is to reopen a few city facilities on May 4 (if nothing drastically changes). 

While that may sound like a major undertaking, it does not drastically change the way we’ve been operating. We will be reopening the City Hall reception area (which is quite small) and the Finance payment window, which is approximately 20 feet to the right of the main reception area. This allows individuals to make any in-person payments that they may need to make. We are also opening the atrium of our Public Safety building and the payment window for the Municipal Court. We will continue to keep our municipal court suspended until the judge and our court staff determine the appropriate time to resume. 

As for our Parks, we will only reopen one of two of our community center buildings, the Alice J. Hawthorne Center, at Jessie Davis Park. Our other community center, located at Hunter Park, will remain closed. It was designated as an official COVID-19 drive through testing center and will remain in operation until further notice. All outdoor amenities, like ball fields, playground equipment, etc. will remain closed as well. 

Our Community Development building will also remain closed to the public at this time. While they might be the department that interacts with the public the most on a daily basis, they have had success with accepting things like building plans, zoning applications, permits, etc. online and will continue to do so. They will, however, have a drop box put outside of their building for any individual or organization that cannot submit their plans or applications online. 

Finally, we also operate a Conference Center across the street from City Hall. Our plan is to keep that closed until July. 

I want to point out that any city facility that will be reopen to the public will have signs indicating our strict adherence to social distancing. Markings will also be put on the floor to indicate six feet of separation (much like you see in drug stores and/or grocery stores). We will continue to conduct city business virtually, whether it is City Council meetings, or meetings with stakeholders. 

We want to open our facilities up slowly to ensure that we are not increasing the risk of COVID-19. It is up to individual businesses to determine whether or not it is appropriate to open their doors back up at this point. We are complying with the Governor’s office, and so we are directing anyone with specific COVID-19 questions to his office. 

 

Aaron Szarowicz 

Community Outreach Coordinator  

Community Relations 

 

Idaho

https://rebound.idaho.gov/stages-of-reopening/

https://rebound.idaho.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/opening-up-guidlines.pdf

 

Data Driven approach:

To advance to the next stage, all criteria must be met. If the criteria indicate trends are beginning to move the wrong direction, or there is evidence that a stage has adversely impacted rates, stages may have to be extended or reversed.

 

Syndromic Criteria

  1. Downward trend or low numbers of COVID-19-like illness patient visits as tracked by Emergency Departments within a 14-day period
  2. Downward trend over most recent reported 14-day period, OR less than 20 visits/day on average over same 14-day period AND Downward trend or very low numbers of patients with COVID-19-like illness admitted from Emergency Departments within a 14-day period

Epidemiologic Criteria

  1. Downward trend or low levels of documented COVID-19 cases reported within a 14-day period  OR
  2. Less than 20 patients per day on average reported statewide over the same 14-day period OR Downward trend of positive COVID-19 PCR tests as a percent of total tests within a 14-day period (including flat or increasing volume of tests)

Healthcare Criteria

  1. Treat all patients without needing to use crisis standards of care AND
  2. Available ventilators, intensive care unit beds, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to safely care for additional COVID-19 patients in hospitals
    1. At least 50 available (unused) ventilators, 50 ICU beds, and available 10-day supply of N95 masks, surgical masks, face shields, gowns, and gloves
  3. Robust COVID-19 testing program in place for at-risk healthcare workers
    1. Downward trend over most recent reported 14- day period, OR less than 2 healthcare workers reported/ day on average over same 14-day period

 

Stage 1: May 1st -May 15th (after all criteria met)

Stage 2: May 16th - May 29th (after all criteria met)

Stage 3: May 30th – June 12th (after all criteria met)

Stage 4: June 12th – June 26th (after all criteria met)

 

Other elements: Reopening phases are based on “employers” and “individuals” and “specific type of employers”. The plan opens businesses incrementally based on type, where businesses that typically involve crowds of persons are opened last, and more critical services like childcare centers and hair salons are opened first. Idahoans must submit business plans to local public health authorities to reopen. Recommendations of social distancing and limitations on groups bigger than 10, with special accommodations available for elderly and medically at risk populations, and the promotion of self-quarantine recommendations for at risk populations.

 

City of Boise, ID 

https://www.cityofboise.org/media/9979/reopeningframework-facilitiesservices-final.pdf 

The city of Boise uses a 5 stage approach for opening up city services incrementally.

 

Stage 1 – Very limited reopening – partial reopening of golf courses, limited public services and staff members in office, although increasing incrementally, some parks open

Stage 2 – Limited reopening – increases of number of public employees allowed back to work, capacity limits on depot and facilities of 10 people, more public parks and restrooms open

Stage 3 – Partial Reopening – certain public meetings return to hybrid, with remote options, maintain remote meetings for other meetings, parks reopen, park play-camps open at minimum number of sites with limitations on participants, full social distancing measures in place, parking enforcement restarts

Stage 4 – Pre-vaccine -Most public facilities and programs open and running with continued social distancing measures, including zoos and watershed program, with managed visitor flow and time entry

Stage 5 – Vaccine Available – no restrictions, but remote options still available, return to pre-covid-19 status quo

 

Iowa

Cedar Rapids, IA 

https://www.cedar-rapids.org/alert_detail/coronavirus_(covid-19).php#updates

April Wing, Cedar Rapids: 

I would be happy to share some of the things we are doing... we have recently announced that we are extending our facility closures and Transit Service until May 15. This aligns with the updated guidelines provided by the State for our county. We have reopened some of our golf courses with various social distancing measures in place.  

In the meantime, the director team has started reconstitution planning to prepare for when the State guidelines change. At this point we are contemplating at least 2 phases for bringing back staff, reconvening previously suspended services, programs, functions, and reopening our facilities, however, we have no idea as to when these plans will need to be activated (we anticipate these plans to be very fluid and departments are prepared to be flexible as the situation changes).  They are also looking at restrictions regarding meetings (both internal & external) as well as travel guidance for both business and personal. 

When reopening our facilities, we anticipate the first phase to be very limited, allowing the public to enter by appointment only and creating restricted routes in our facilities. We have installed protective barriers at all service counters and help desks, floor stickers to assist with social distancing, posters to remind customers and employees of social distancing requirements, and have added barriers between cubicles.

We are considering additional protective measures and I will share those with you as they develop.  

April Wing 

City Manager’s Office  

 

Kansas

City of Shawnee and Johnson County, Kansas 

https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Reopen-Kansas-Framework.pdf 

https://www.jocogov.org/sites/default/files/documents/CMO/Phased%20opening%20in%20Johnson%20County%202.pdf 

Guidelines for reopening largely developed off of ability to maintain social distancing requirements within a workplace or business setting and venue, and the number of people allowed in gatherings

 

Phase 1: Begins May 4th

  • Gatherings no larger than 10 people
  • Restaurants 10 person limit gathering
  • Enforced social distancing 6ft distance
  • Fundamental cleaning
  • No visits to long term care centers

Phase 2: No earlier than May 18th

  • Gatherings no larger than 30 people
  • Restaurants 10 person limit gathering, 50% occupancy of bars
  • Enforced social distancing of 6ft distance
  • Fundamental cleaning
  • No visits to long term care centers

Phase 3: No earlier than June 1st

  • Gatherings no larger than 90 people
  • Restaurants 10 person limit gathering
  • Enforced social distancing of 6ft distance
  • Fundamental cleaning
  • No visits to long term care centers

Phase 4/Phase out: No earlier than June 15th

All businesses not prohibited to the right MAY OPEN IF:

  • They can maintain at least 6 feet of distance between consumers (individuals or groups)
    • Restaurants or dining establishments may meet this requirement by using physical barriers sufficient to prevent virus spread between seated customers or groups of seated customers.
  • AND fundamental cleaning and public health practices are followed.
  • AND businesses must avoid any instances in which groups of more than 10 individuals are in one location and are unable to consistently maintain 6 feet of distance with only infrequent or incidental moments of closer proximity.
    • This does not limit the total occupancy of a business, but requires that businesses limit areas and instances in which consistent physical distancing cannot be maintained, such as tables, entrances, lobbies, break rooms, check-out areas, etc.

 

City of Great Bend, Kansas 

The full reopening plan for City services is available for the City of Great Bend, Kansas.

Elements of this plan include earliest dates for each phase:

 

Phase 1 – May 5th

  • Social distancing, no public access council meetings, social distancing and 10 person gatherings enforced, courts reopen, limits on in person staffing

Phase 2 – May 18th

  • public access to police and fire, zoo, public works, but staffing isolation, social distancing, no gatherings greater than 30

Phase 3 – June 1st

  • 90 people limits on gathering, council meetings made public, staffing isolation continues, virtual interactions still recommended, staffing levels return to normal, enforced social distancing

Phase 4 – June 15th

  • full reopening, resume non-essential travel, open public restrooms, playgrounds, meeting rooms

 

Missouri

Show Me Strong Reopening Plan

https://showmestrong.mo.gov/

https://health.mo.gov/living/healthcondiseases/communicable/novel-coronavirus/pdf/economic-reopening.pdf

https://governor.mo.gov/press-releases/archive/governor-parson-signs-executive-order-20-09-extending-state-emergency

https://showmestrong.mo.gov/faq/

 

This plan does not roll out their reopening plan in succinct phases. Expect developments over time.

  • The first phase of the plan was issued as an Order on April 27th, beginning May 4th, and ending May 31st, 2020.
  • Even though the state is reopening, Missouri will remain in a state of emergency into June 2 to continue to disperse resources. The emergency order waived over 450 state statutes.
  • The plan highlights that individuals engaging in retail sales shall limit number of individuals in a particular location to 25% square footage of a location less than 10,000 square feet, or 10% or less of the entity’s fire or building code occupancy as set by local authorities.
  • Emphasize consistent social distancing of 6ft apart with all persons that are not family
  • There will be limitations for dining settings, of no more than 10 people to a group in any setting, with groups seated 6 ft apart.
  • No business restrictions or crowd restrictions outside of the above.
  • Childcare centers will open for business
  • There is flexibility for local jurisdictions to make further ordinances, rules, regulations, and orders inconsistent with the order that may be necessary for a locality.
  • Enforcement by local public health authority

 

Jackson, Missouri 

Reopening Plan for City Facilities

http://www.jacksonmo.org//NewsDetail.aspx?NewsID=2682 

While some City facilities will continue to remain closed to the public to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, several buildings and amenities are set to reopen on Monday, May 4.

City Hall

  • Plexiglass protective barriers at customer service counters to foster physical distancing and help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • The Collector’s office open, encourage citizens to use the drive-through lanes at City Hall, the online bill pay option, or conduct business over the phone
  • Board meetings and study sessions resume, however, the Board Room has been reconfigured in a way that adheres to the social distancing and seating is limited. Board Meetings will also be streamed on the City’s YouTube channel.

Parks and Rec

  • Civic center open, normal business with limits on number of guests, temporary signage to encourage social distancing
  • Open tennis courts, skate park, recreation trails, green space. NO on basketball courts, swimming pools, league sports, playgrounds, and public bathrooms (except 2)

Courts

  • The Supreme Court of Missouri extended the statewide suspension of in-person proceedings through Friday, May 15.

Public Safety

  • Police: The lobby of the Public Safety Complex building will reopen, only speak to guests through the front window in the Dispatch Center.  Non-emergency reports will continue to be taken over the phone.  Station tours are currently postponed.
  • Fire:  The lobbies of Fire Station #2 and the Fire Administration building will remain closed until further notice.  The Department has suspended public relation activities (including smoke detector installations, home inspections, station tours, and car seat installations).

 

Nevada

Nevada United Roadmap to Recovery

Nevada’s plan to reopen is data driven and comprehensive like many other communities. The initial stay at home orders which had been extended to May 15th will begin easing restrictions thereafter in 4 phases based on criteria largely provided by the American Enterprise Institute: "National Coronavirus Response: A Road Map to Reopening"

 

Goals of Plan:

Goal 1: Reduce transmission of novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) through aggressive and coordinated public health strategies.

Goal 2: Using a gradual and tiered approach, safely return Nevada’s economy and society to a “new normal” – yet prepared – condition.

Goal 3: Fully prepare and make resilient the healthcare infrastructure to respond to the health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Goal 4: Champion resilient policies that inspire generational confidence and grow Nevada’s diverse labor force and overall economic success.

Goal 5: Turn our unprecedented challenges into a rare opportunity to transform Nevada’s

 

Criteria for moving between phases:

Criteria 1: Downward Trending Data Consistent and sustainable downward trajectory of COVID-19 cases and decrease in the trend of COVID19 hospitalizations over a 14-day period. This will be measured by

  • Decline in percentage of people testing positive.
  • Decrease in the trend of COVID-19 hospitalizations

Criteria 2: Strengthen Healthcare Infrastructure Ability to maintain hospital capacity without Crisis Standards of Care

Criteria 3: Testing Expansion Expanded ability for healthcare providers to administer tests for symptomatic patients and sufficient laboratory testing capacity to process COVID-19 testing samples.

Criteria 4: Case Contact Tracing Sufficient public health workforce capacity in local and state health departments to conduct case contact tracing (detect, test, trace, isolate)

Criteria 5: Protect Vulnerable Populations Sustained ability to protect vulnerable populations; outbreaks minimized in special settings like health facilities and nursing homes

 

Phases

PHASE 1: Battle Born Beginning

• Goals:

Begin transition from community mitigation to case-based interventions, continue strengthening public health suppression efforts, and focus on easing restrictions on some businesses and public life, with modifications

• Summary:

May open 1) outdoor spaces, 2) small businesses, and 3) select retail, under strict social distancing measures, hygiene, and occupancy controls. No social events or public gatherings over 10.  Relax "Stay at Home" to encourage "Safer at Home." Vulnerable populations should remain home until the outbreak has subsided.  Communicate the repercussions of a recurrence of disease growth. Strongly encourage improvised face coverings use by all.

• Potential Duration:

Anticipated evaluation period based upon metrics for an estimated 2-3 weeks

 

PHASE 2: Silver State Stabilization

• Goals: Control COVID-19 transmission through fully expanded and robust public health efforts statewide, continue to carefully lift restrictions on businesses and public life

 • Summary: Broader opening of Commerce/Retail, services, and public life under extremely strict social distancing measures, hygiene, and occupancy controls. "Safer at Home" recommendations remain in place. Vulnerable populations should remain home until the outbreak has subsided. Strongly encourage improvised face covering use by all.

• Potential Duration: Dependent upon progress toward goals and sustained ability to meet the criteria. Minimum of 2-3 weeks needed to assess and evaluate data and trends throughout phase.

 

PHASE 3: On the Road to Home Means Nevada

• Goals: Continue easing restrictions further in preparation for return to normalcy

• Summary: Ease measures on some public and mass gatherings and non-essential travel with highly modified operations. Vulnerable populations should remain home until the outbreak has subsided.

• Potential Duration: According to "National Coronavirus Response: A Road Map to Reopening" by the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), states can transition into the final phase ("Phase 4: Home Means Nevada- Our New Normal") once "a robust surveillance sentinel system is in place, coupled with widespread point-of-care testing and a robust ability to implement tracing, isolation, and quarantines—and this is supported by the availability of therapeutics that can help mitigate the risk of spread or reduce serious outcomes in those with infections—or alternatively a vaccine has been developed and tested for safety and efficacy."

 

PHASE 4: Home Means Nevada – Our New Normal

• Goals: Return to normalcy in daily lives, including education, work, and social and public life

• Summary: Most/all businesses operating, with enhanced hygiene and vigilance.

• Potential Duration: Perpetual unless second spike in disease occurs After a successful Phase 3, the goal is to enter a “new normal” that will allow Nevadans to ease away from social and physical distancing measures. According to experts and publications from across the country, this final phase will not be able to be successfully entered into until all previous public health expansion efforts are “supported by the availability of therapeutics that can help mitigate the risk of spread or reduce serious outcomes in those with infections—or alternatively a vaccine has been developed and tested for safety and efficacy, we can enter Phase III” - AEI-National coronavirus response: A road map to reopening Currently, there is no realistic timeline yet

 

Tennessee

Knoxville, TN 

http://media.graytvinc.com/documents/COVID-Reopen-Plan.pdf

https://knoxvilletn.gov/UserFiles/Servers/Server_109478/File/MayorsOffice/Covid19/COVID-Reopen-Chart.pdf 

https://www.knoxvilletn.gov/cms/One.aspx?portalId=109562&pageId=16682374 

 

Knoxvillle’s reopening plans are guided by the Knox County Health Department. Their plan also draws from the Public Health Principles for a Phased Reopening During COVID-19: Guidance for Governors.

A minimum of 28 days will be spent in each phase regardless of whether the benchmarks are met at an earlier timepoint.

 

Benchmarks for reopening are provided by the Knox County Health Department:

  1. Sustained reduction or stability in new cases for 14 days. A sustained reduction or stability in new cases for 14 days is an indicator for movement towards the next phase.
  2. Community-wide sustained and increased diagnostic testing with consistent or decreased test result reporting turnaround time.
  3. Sustained or increased public health capability to rapidly interview new cases, identify close contacts, and ensure that isolation and quarantine are effective.
  4. Health care system capabilities remain within current and forecasted surge capacity
  5. Sustained or decreased COVID-19 related death rate for identified positive or probable cases.sign

 

Nashville, TN 

https://www.asafenashville.org/ 

https://www.nashville.gov/Portals/0/SiteContent/MayorsOffice/docs/news/Cooper/RoadmapForReopeningGrid.pdf 

https://www.asafenashville.org/roadmap-for-reopening-nashville/#present 

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/2020/04/21/tennessee-coronavirus-reopen-economy-bill-lee/2995782001/ 

The city of Nashville uses benchmarks on

  1. Public health capacity
  2. Testing capacity
  3. Hospital capacity on floor beds and ICU
  4. Transmission rates
  5. Case trends.

 

Phase-In Plan

PRESENT DAY

All Residents

  • stay home unless absolutely necessary
  • All work from home unless essential
  • Wear masks in public
  • Schools closed
  • No gatherings over 10

Restaurants& Bars Serving Food

  • Closed
  • Only curbside service and takeout

Bars & Entertainment Venues - Closed

Retail Stores & Commercial Businesses

  • Closed

Nail Salons, Hair Salons, Massage, Etc. - Closed

Healthcare & Dental

  • Beginning April 30, routine and elective procedures < age 70
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Gyms & Fitness- Closed

Playgrounds, Tennis & Basketball courts - Closed

Sports Venues – Closed

If there is positive improvement/stability of metrics for 14 days, start Phase One

PHASE ONE

All Residents

  • Age 65+ and High-risk stay at home
  • All work from home if possible
  • All residents wear masks in public
  • Schools closed
  • No gatherings over 10

Restaurants & Bars Serving Food

  • Open at 1/2 capacity
  • Clean all surfaces after every use
  • Employees screened daily and required to wear face masks
  • Bar areas closed and no live music

Bars & Entertainment Venues - Closed

Retail Stores & Commercial Businesses

  • Open at 1/2 capacity
  • Employees screened daily and wear face masks

Nail Salons, Hair Salons, Massage, Etc. - Closed

Healthcare & Dental

  • Routine and elective procedures < age 70
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Gyms & Fitness- Closed

Playgrounds, Tennis & Basketball courts - Closed

Sports Venues - Closed

If there is positive improvement/stability of metrics for 14 days, move to Phase Two

If there is a significant decrease of metrics, go back to Phase One

PHASE TWO

All Residents

  • Age 65+ and high-risk stay at home
  • Work from home if possible
  • Wear masks in public
  • Schools closed
  • Small gatherings up to 50

Restaurants & Bars Serving Food

  • Open at 3/4 capacity
  • Clean all surfaces after every use
  • Employees screened daily and required to wear face masks
  • Bar areas closed and no live music

Bars & Entertainment Venues- Closed

Retail Stores & Commercial Businesses

  • Open at 3/4 capacity
  • Employees screened daily and wear face masks

Nail Salons, Hair Salons, Massage, Etc.

  • Open by Appointment only; no walk-ins
  • Limit number of staff and customers to 10
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Healthcare & Dental

  • Routine and elective procedures for all age groups
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Gyms & Fitness- Closed

Playgrounds, Tennis & Basketball courts

  • Open with social distancing

Sports Venues- Closed

If there is positive improvement/stability of metrics for 14 days, move to Phase Three

If there is a significant decrease of metrics, go back to Phase Two

PHASE THREE

All Residents

  • Age 65+ and high-risk stay at home
  • Work from home If possible
  • Wear masks in public
  • Nonresidential K-12 schools can reopen
  • Gatherings up to 100

Restaurants & Bars Serving Food

  • Open at full capacity
  • Clean all surfaces after every use
  • Employees screened daily and required to wear face masks
  • Bars open at 50% capacity; no standing at bars
  • Live music permitted

Bars & Entertainment Venues

  • Open at 1/2 Capacity
  • Includes tours, museums, theaters, etc.
  • Clean all surfaces after every use
  • Employees screened daily and required to wear face masks

Retail Stores & Commercial Businesses

  • Open at full Capacity
  • Employees screened daily and wear face masks

Nail Salons, Hair Salons, Massage, Etc.

  • Open by appointment only; no walk-ins
  • Limit number of staff and customers to 10
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Healthcare & Dental

  • Routine and elective procedures for all age groups
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Gyms & Fitness

  • Open
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks
  • Clean equipment after every use

Playgrounds, Tennis & Basketball courts

  • Open with social distancing

Sports Venues

  •  Closed

If there is positive improvement/stability of metrics for 14 days, move to Phase Four

If there is a significant decrease of metrics, go back to Phase Three

PHASE FOUR

All Residents

  • Age 65+ and high-risk stay home
  • Work from home is optional
  • Wearing masks is optional, but recommended
  • Nonresidential K-12 schools can reopen
  • Gatherings over 100 permitted

Restaurants & Bars Serving Food

  • Open at full capacity
  • Clean all surfaces after every use
  • Employees screened daily
  • Employees wearing masks is optional, but recommended

Bars & Entertainment Venues

  • Open at full capacity
  • Clean all surfaces after every use
  • Employees screened daily
  • Employees wearing masks is optional, but recommended

Retail Stores & Commercial Businesses

  • Open at full capacity
  • Employees screened daily
  • Employees wearing masks is optional, but recommended

Nail Salons, Hair Salons, Massage, Etc.

  • Open by Appointment only; no walk-ins
  • Limit number of staff and customers to 10
  • Employees screened daily
  • Employees wearing masks is optional, but recommended

Healthcare & Dental

  • Routine and elective procedures for all age groups
  • Employees screened daily and wear masks

Gyms & Fitness

  • Open
  • Clean equipment after every use
  • Employees screened daily
  • Employees wearing masks is optional, but recommended

Playgrounds, Tennis & Basketball courts

  • Open

Sports Venues

  • Open
  • Employees screened daily
  • Employees wearing masks is optional, but recommended.

 

 Washington

Washington’s Safe Start Reopening Plan

READINESS AND CAPABILITIES NEEDED

  1. Health Care System Readiness Adequate bed capacity, staffing and supplies in the health care system to handle a surge in COVID-19 cases, measured by:
    1. Number and percentage of licensed beds and ICU beds available in hospitals
    2. Number of available ventilators
    3. Days of personal protective equipment (PPE) supply available at hospitals, long-term care facilities,  and other health care settings
    4. Ability of the state to fill high priority PPE requests from local emergency management agencies
    5. Ability of hospitals and other health care facilities to surge and coordinate movement of patients
  2. Testing Capacity and Availability Ability for everyone with COVID-19 symptoms and those with high-risk exposures to be tested immediately using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and rapidly receive test results as measured by:
    1. Geographic distribution of testing sites and ability to serve the entire population
    2. Number and capacity of laboratories in Washington performing COVID-19 testing
    3. Availability of sufficient swabs, viral transport media, lab reagents, and other materials required for COVID-19 testing
    4. Number of tests performed per day
  3. Case and Contact Investigations Ability to rapidly isolate those with COVID-19, identify and quarantine their contacts, and provide case management services as measured by:
    1. Number of investigators trained and working
    2. Plans for case management
    3. Availability of isolation and quarantine facilities in local jurisdictions
    4. Percent of cases investigated within 24 hours of receipt of positive test report
    5. Percent of contact investigations initiated within 48 hours of receipt of positive test report
  4. Ability to Protect High-Risk Populations Ability to immediately respond to outbreaks in congregate settings, such as long-term care facilities, behavioral health facilities, agricultural worker housing, homeless shelters and correctional facilities, and address the needs of other high-risk populations, including the elderly and the medically frail, measured by:
    1. Number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities
    2. Demographic data, including race/ethnicity data, on COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths
    3. Ability of local or state strike teams with adequate PPE to respond to an outbreak within 24 hours

Washington State’s Phased in Approach emphasizes different guidelines for employers, individuals, businesses, and high risk groups.

Washington’s approach is different from other communities, with no gatherings allowed in Phase1, gatherings of 5 people in Phase 2, gatherings of 50 people in Phase 3, and more than 50 gatherings allowed by Phase 4.

They will also focus on opening essential businesses and workplaces up before opening restaurants and event venues. They will utilize partial reopenings, i.e. in Phase 3 - 75% capacity of table sizes, no larger than 10 in restaurants, movie venues less than 50% capacity, and bar areas limited to 25% capacity. These will expand throughout the phases.

 

What other resources are there?

Public and Business Sector

CDC

Reopening Workplaces During the Covid-19 Pandemic

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/fs-reopening-america-workers-at-risk.pdf

Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools, and Homes

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/reopen-guidance.html

 

Public Sector

How our cities can reopen after the COVID-19 pandemic

Brookings Institute

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2020/03/24/how-our-cities-can-reopen-after-the-covid-19-pandemic/ 

 

Public Sector

Public Health Principles for a Phased Reopening During COVID-19: Guidance for Governors

John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

https://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/our-work/pubs_archive/pubs-pdfs/2020/200417-reopening-guidance-governors.pdf

An overview of different risk levels and safety precautions associated with certain operations within the city and how to mitigate those precautions at different levels. Categories of contact levels, contact numbers, and mitigation strategies. Addresses essential and nonessential businesses, outdoor activities, etc. using WHO guidelines on safety.

 

Public and Business Sectors

OSHA 

Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3990.pdf 

Standards

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/covid-19/standards.html 

Osha Guidance Summary: Preparing Workplaces for Covid-19 https://success.ada.org/~/media/CPS/Files/COVID/OSHA_Guidance_on_Preparing_Workplaces_for_COVID-19.pdf 

 

Public and Business Sector

Opening Up America Again

From the White House:

President Trump has unveiled Guidelines for Opening Up America Again, a three-phased approach based on the advice of public health experts.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/openingamerica/ 

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Guidelines-for-Opening-Up-America-Again.pdf

 

Business Sector

U.S. COVID-19: Preparing a Reopening Plan - Five Steps to Take Right Now

Bryan Cave Leighton Peisner Law

https://www.bclplaw.com/en-US/insights/covid-19-us-preparing-a-re-opening-plan-five-steps-to-take-right-now.html 

As state governments and businesses look towards restarting the economy, the consensus is that as the U.S. gradually re-opens, the look and feel of businesses will change dramatically. Before the world can return to its full pre-COVID-19 normal, this interim period between the lifting of shelter in place orders and the broad distribution of vaccines or effective treatments is projected by experts to last at least one, and possibly as long as two years.

This client communication will focus on public facing businesses which must significantly change their operations to reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission. Non-healthcare businesses which have frequent contact with the general public, such as retailers, are deemed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to be medium exposure risk. Before such businesses re-open, they should have a comprehensive reopening plan.

 

Business Sector

COVID-19 Re-Opening Best Practice

International Council of Shopping Centers 

https://www.icsc.com/uploads/t07-subpage/Coronavirus_Reopening_Guidance_final_043020.pdf?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=Eloqua&utm_campaign=2020MEM&utm_term=1&utm_content=Members 

 

 

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