Evolution of Your Maintenance Management Program

Asset Management and Maintenance Management
Inadequate attention to key assets from a maintenance perspective
can result in costly system failures. A well planned and optimized maintenance program can help minimize this risk of failure, result in lower lifecycle costs, and is a fundamental component of a complete Asset Management program. The practice of Asset Management entails risk management and looking at assets from a lifecycle perspective.

 

ARTICLE | Oct 22, 2005

Asset Management and Maintenance Management
Inadequate attention to key assets from a maintenance perspective
can result in costly system failures. A well planned and optimized maintenance program can help minimize this risk of failure, result in lower lifecycle costs, and is a fundamental component of a complete Asset Management program. The practice of Asset Management entails risk management and looking at assets from a lifecycle perspective. In terms of maintenance, this implies adopting appropriate maintenance practices based on the type and criticality of assets. Attaining an environment of lifecycle management may involve a progression through various maintenance approaches, until the right approach for the asset is achieved. This article introduces six approaches to maintenance management.

Asset Performance Management - Maintenance Approach Model

Six general maintenance approaches, or effective stages of evolution, can be defined. Each stage represents a progression from the previous in terms of complexity to achieve and potential value to the organization.

· Stage 1 – Reactive Repair. This stage is characterized as focusing on fixing systems and equipment when they break. This is usually indicative of ‘firefighting’ and emergency repairs, which are more expensive than planned maintenance.

· Stage 2 – Demand Maintenance. This stage sees the organization migrating to a more planned approached to doing maintenance and repair work.

· Stage 3 – Preventative Maintenance. As an organization matures, equipment will be managed through predefined preventative maintenance plans.

· Stage 4 – Predictive Maintenance. With historical breakdown data, an organization will be able to predict potential equipment and system failures and thus perform just-in-time maintenance work.

· Stage 5 – Reliability Centered Maintenance. With appropriate operational and breakdown trends, organizations can migrate towards reliability centered maintenance approaches, where engineering based maintenance programs are complemented with operational performance trends to "push" the maintenance cycles to the max within the context of an overall system risk assessment.

· Stage 6 – Life Cycle Management. Full maturity is defined as an organization that is managing all of its assets based on a lifecycle approach. Asset purchase decisions are not based on the "latest" technology advances, but are based on appropriate analysis associated with managing the asset over its full useful life, including limiting the diversity of systems and equipment throughout the asset inventory. Based on the system/equipment criticality and function, appropriate maintenance, repair and replace programs are established and managed throughout the life of assets. A true asset lifecycle approach may see a hybrid mix of maintenance approaches for various assets. For example, less critical assets may be allowed to fail while more critical assets will employ predictive or reliability maintenance.

In all of the advanced stages, it is important to note that the stage name (e.g. Reliability Centered Maintenance) represents the ability to practice the named maintenance approach but does not imply that all assets should be treated with the same approach. Treating all assets with a proactive maintenance approach is not cost effective. As discussed under Stage 6, criticality, cost and other factors of the asset should dictate the maintenance approach employed.

An organization’s progression in migrating towards a fully evolved maintenance management program can be measured in terms of the maturity in each of the following three elements:

· Performance Management Framework – a clear set of asset specific strategies, objectives, initiatives and goals, where meaningful targets can be established and progress measured. These include, for example, the setting of system performance targets, exchange of performance information with other divisions and organizations (e.g., benchmarking), and the communication of goals and progress.

· Practices and Processes – a set of common work methods and asset specific management practices with a target of implementing defined industry best practices. These methods and practices will include workflow definitions, accountability models, skill requirements, and approaches for work and Asset Management.

· Data and Technology – an integrated set of information, engineering, and communications technologies used to gather, store, interpret and report performance data and information. This will include data standards and related information structures required to aggregate information to calculate the desired indicators to support the Performance Management Framework

Effective maintenance management, like Asset Management, depends on organizational maturity in multiple elements. As an organization progresses through the six stages, it improves its ability to provide effective and efficient service delivery at a lower lifecycle cost. An optimized maintenance program minimizes the risk of failures that might result in impacts on safety, environment, cost, or secondary damage, including public perception. Additionally, an evolved maintenance program sets the stage for even greater benefits from practicing Asset Management.

For more information, contact Mark Damm for Trilogics Inc.at 604.484.7188 x22 or email mark.damm@trilogics.net.  

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